Kangaroo paws (Anigozanthos spp.) are some of the most iconic Australian native plants, much loved for their clusters of claw-like flowers that open from the furry, tactile buds. Bird-attracting flowers sit on top of upright stems that emerge out of the strappy grass-like leaf clumps. Bloom colour varies from red through to orange, yellow and pink, although the relatively new ‘Bush Diamond’ has near-white flowers.


How to grow kangaroo paw in a garden

  1. Fill starter pots or trays with Yates Seed Raising Mix. Sow seeds, cover, firm down and water well. Keep the soil moist so the seeds don’t dry out. 
  2. While the seedlings are growing, choose a sunny spot in the garden and prepare the planting area well by digging in Yates Dynamic Lifter Soil Improver & Plant Fertiliser.
  3. Allow seedlings to grow to about 10 cm before transplanting.
  4. When transplanting them into your prepared garden bed, ensure seedlings are well spaced – at least 30 to 40 cm apart. Mulch lightly with an organic mulch keeping the mulch well clear from the base of the plant, and water in well.
  5. Feed lightly in Spring and Autumn with Yates Dynamic Lifter Soil Improver & Plant Fertiliser to ensure strong root development and mass flowering.
 
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How to grow kangaroo paw in a pot

  1. Choose a sunny spot in the garden for your pot. 
  2. Fill pots with Yates Potting Mix with Dynamic Lifter. Sow seeds spaced at least 30 to 40 cm apart, cover, firm down and water well. Keep the soil moist so the seeds don’t dry out. 
  3. Once the seedlings have grown to 10 cm, mulch lightly with an organic mulch, ensuring that it is kept well clear of the base of the plant and water in well.
  4. Feed lightly in Spring and Autumn with Yates Dynamic Lifter Soil Improver & Plant Fertiliser to ensure strong root development and mass flowering.
 

Growing tips

  • One of the most striking kangaroo paws is the slightly tricky-to-grow Macropidia fulginosa, the black kangaroo paw.
  • Watering at the base of the plant helps prevent diseases such as Ink Disease from developing on the leaves. 
  • Cut back after flower flushes. 
  • The big growers can be cut right to ground level in early spring.
  • The toughest kangaroo paws are the large growers that can reach up to two metres tall. As a general rule, these are the best to choose for humid conditions, but they do take up quite a lot of space in the garden. Smaller growers, which are more garden and pot friendly, may make better choices, even if they have to be replaced more frequently.
  • New plants can also be produced by dividing established clumps. Do this in spring or early autumn. Lift the plants out of the ground, split into sections, wash off the old soil and pot into fresh mix. Leave in pots for a few months to re-establish.
  • Plants are most spectacular when grown in clumps.

Yates Varieties

Kangaroo Paw Mix

Velvety, claw-shaped blooms on strong stems emerge from sculptured, upright clumps of glossy green, strappy leaves.


More Plants

Yellow Paper Daisy

Yellow Paper Daisies are little bursts of sunshine that produce abundance of sunshine-yellow daisies that brighten garden beds or pots.

Banksia

Banksias are a great choice for understory plantings with a spicy fragrance & attractive, delicate flowers that are mostly pink.

King Fern

A true King of a plant, the King Fern (Angiopteris evecta) is a giant in the rainforest garden.

Pink Paper Daisy

This splendid array of pink paper daisies (Rhodanthe spp.) is ideal for a massed garden display or as a feature in pots.


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