Home grown tomatoes are renowned for their flavour, but they can suffer from a number of problems. 

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Guidelines to grow healthy tomatoes

  • Some tomato diseases are carried in the soil, so choose a different spot each year (avoid planting in the same part of the garden for at least four years). If you don’t have enough space for this, think about growing tomatoes in a pot, ensuring its at least 400-500mm wide. 
  • Some tomato diseases are spread by small sap-sucking insects such as aphids and thrips. Watch out for these – even though they’re small they can be deadly carriers. Spray leaves thoroughly with Yates Nature's Way Organic Citrus, Vegie & Ornamental Spray Ready to Use.
  • Some tomato diseases are fungal which, like all fungi, need moisture to germinate, so the first step is to keep the leaves dry. Do this by applying water at the base of the plant and by watering in the morning so the leaves can quickly dry. Removing lower leaves will help, too – they can be affected by water splashing up from the soil – as will mulching around the base of the plant. 
  • When buying tomato plants or seeds, look for varieties that mention disease resistance. Tomatoes are particularly disease-prone in warm, humid climates, so wilt-resistant varieties such as Tomato Big Beef Hybrid and Tomato Roma are good choices for these areas.
  • Prevent blossom end rot – sunken areas at the base of the fruit – by applying Yates Thrive Natural Garden Limeor gypsum before planting. Water regularly and mulch plants to avoid fluctuations in soil temperature and moisture. 
  • Tomato grubs create holes in the fruit, using Yates Success Ultra Insect Control Concentrate will help control these grubs.
  • Leaves that are distorted, yellow, or have black spots could be the symptoms of Tomato Blight. Prevent by spraying regularly with Yates Liquid Copper Fungicide Concentrate and remove affected plants.
  • Well-fed plants are better able to resist pests and diseases. Feed regularly with Yates Thrive Tomato Granular Plant Food.
  • Finally – if all else fails – grow cherry tomatoes. They don’t seem to be troubled by anything!

 


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